Cervical Cancer

Transcript

Maj Patel
Cervical cancer is usually a slow growing malignancy that begins at the exposed outer region of the cervix. Normal cervical cells can gradually develop precancerous changes that turn into cancer. Providers use several terms to describe these precancerous changes, including:

  • Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, or CIN
  • Squamous intraepithelial lesion, or SIL, and
  • Dysplasia

Lt Col Flemings
There are two main types of cervical cancers: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Cervical cancers and cervical precancers are classified by how they look under a microscope. Most cervical cancers are squamous cell carcinomas, which most often begin where the ectocervix joins the endocervix.

Maj Patel
Adenocarcinomas make up a smaller percentage of cervical cancer, but unfortunately, they are becoming more common. This type of cervical cancer develops from the mucus-producing gland cells of the endocervix.

Lt Col Flemings
In some uncommon cases, cervical cancer can have characteristics of both squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas. These conditions are called adenosquamous carcinomas or mixed carcinomas.

Maj Patel
It’s important to keep in mind that not all women with precancerous changes of the cervix will develop cancer. For most women, precancerous cells will remain unchanged and go away without any treatment. In most cases, if these precancers are treated, cervical cancer can be prevented.